Columbus State University
1999-2000 Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions
PHIL

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PHIL - Philosophy

PHIL 1105. Survey of Philosophical Thought (3-0-3)An introduction to the ideas of several philosophers on the topics of human reason, knowledge, justice, happiness, religion, and morality examined in their historical settings and for their impact on western civilization.

PHIL 2105. Formal Logic (3-0-3) An introduction to contemporary techniques in logic with special attention given to deductive models and decision methods. Emphasis is placed on the application of logic to argument analysis, problem solving, foundations of mathematics, science, and computer science.

PHIL 2106. Critical Thinking (3-0-3) A systematic introduction to the discipline of correct reasoning. Emphasis is on the structure and criteria of good inductive and deductive argument, problem solving, and an analysis of relevant and irrelevant techniques of persuasion.

PHIL 2135. Theories and Issues in Moral Philosophy (3-0-3) An examination of the main theories of moral obligation and evaluation with application to current moral issues. Emphasis on discussion of the ideas and procedures in analysis and judgment of moral problems.

PHIL 3106. Mathematical Logic (3-0-3) Prerequisite: PHIL 2105. This course is intended to enhance the student’s understanding of logic by investigating the applications of truth-functional and axiomatic First Order Predicate Calculus to such topics as set theory, proof theory, scientific inquiry, the foundations of mathematics, and computer science.

PHIL 3115. Ancient-Medieval Philosophy (3-0-3) A survey of the origin and developments in philosophical thought from ancient times to the beginning of the Modern era (Renaissance). The doctrines of the philosophers will be examined in relation to their cultural settings and for their relevance today.

PHIL 3116. Modern-Contemporary Philosophy (3-0-3) A survey of the main development in philosophical thought from the beginning of the Modern Period (Renaissance) to the present. The doctrines of the philosophers will be examined in relation to their cultural settings and for their relevance today.

PHIL 3125. Religions of the World (3-0-3) A philosophical study of influential world religions. Includes an analysis and comparison of major religions such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

PHIL 3145. Foundations of Empirical Science (3-0-3) An analysis of the theoretical basis of scientific inquiry. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the scientific method as well as such topics as explanation and prediction, formalized systems, confirmation, and empirical meaning.

PHIL 3575. Selected Topics in Philosophy (3-0-3) An examination of selected subjects of philosophical interest. Topics may include theories of knowledge, environmental issues, eastern philosophies, or any subject not explicitly covered in the curriculum, and may be cross-disciplinary or limited in scope. When offered, the specific topic for this course will be listed in the course schedule booklet.

PHIL 3795. Philosophy Seminar (3-0-3) A seminar on various issues of philosophical interest. Topics may be specialized or cross-disciplinary in nature. When offered, the topic for the seminar will be listed in the course schedule booklet.

PHIL 3899. Independent Study (3-0-3) Individual research on philosophical subjects under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Bibliography and research paper required. Prior agreement with instructor is necessary before enrollment.


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Last Updated: 2/1/11