Columbus State University
1999-2000 Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions
ROTC

Return to Table of Contents


ROTC - Reserve Officer Training Corps

ROTC 1215. Wilderness Survival (1-2-2) Learn basic survival and outdoor skills to live off the land. Major areas of instruction include: mountaineering--rappelling, knot tying, rope bridges, and rock climbing; survival skills--building improvised shelters, survival kits, animal traps, and water procurement; water survival/drownproofing; marksmanship; land navigation--map reading, orienteering, and compass skills; and canoeing. Course includes overnight field exercise and Saturday day trip. Classes take place around Columbus, Flint River, and Fort Benning areas.

ROTC 1216. Leadership Values and Skills (1-2-2) Explore key leadership values and skills. Major areas covered are: time management, professional writing skills, problem solving, protocol, preparing and presenting briefings, ethics, leadership values and traits. Laboratory meets every other Friday for four hours.

ROTC 2225. Basic Military Land Navigation and First Aid (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ROTC 1215 and ROTC 1216. General instruction on the basic techniques of map reading, land navigation skills, and life saving techniques used in the U.S. Army and required of Army leaders (cadets seeking to become Army officers). Instruction includes identifying terrain features, determining grid coordinates, determining elevation, measuring distance, using a lensatic compass, shock, and other preventive medicine procedures. Academic classes meet two hours per week. Leadership laboratory meets every other week for four hours. Optional activities include participation in Ranger Challenge, Cadet Club, Raider Club, Color Guard, physical fitness training and planned weekend field training exercises (FTXs).

ROTC 2226. Basic Military Skills and Tactics (2-2-3) Prerequisites: ROTC 1215 and ROTC 1216. Instruction in individual and team aspects of military tactics involving the application of Army leadership and management techniques at the small unit level. Skills development includes learning troop leading procedures, principals of offensive and defensive operation, individual/team movement techniques, and familiarization with basic Army communication equipment and procedure. Academic classes meet two hours per week. Leadership laboratory meets every other week for four hours. Optional activities include participation in Ranger Challenge, Cadet Club, Raider Club, Color Guard, physical fitness training and planned weekend field exercises (FTXs).

ROTC 2420. Camp Challenge (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair. A six week summer camp conducted at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The student receives pay. Travel, lodging, and most meal costs are defrayed by the Army. The environment is rigorous, and is similar to Army Basic Training. No military obligation incurred. Open only to students who have not taken all four of ROTC 1000 and 2000 level classes, and who pass a physical examination (paid for by ROTC). Completion of ROTC 2420 qualifies a student for entry into the Advanced Course. Three different cycles are normally offered during the summer, but spaces are limited by the Army. Candidates can apply for a space any time during the school year prior to the summer. (S/U grading.)

ROTC 3231. Advanced Leadership and Military Tactics 1 (3-2-4) Prerequisites: ROTC 1215, ROTC 1216, ROTC 2225, ROTC 2226, or ROTC 2420, or students with prior service (with approval of the Department of Military Science). Instruction focuses on advanced leadership development and involves cadets participating in practical opportunities and exercises requiring them to lead small groups. Cadets receive counseling, coaching, and encouragement from experienced Army cadre along with a personal assessment and feedback concerning their leadership style. Leadership situations increase in complexity as the cadet progresses through the course. Classroom subjects include the Army’s 12 Leadership dimensions, evaluation and assessment techniques, the Army’s After Action Review (AAR) process, a review of basic course subjects, land navigation, operations orders and small unit offensive operations. Academic course students are required to attend physical training and one weekend field training exercises (FTX). Optional activities include participation in Ranger Challenge, Cadet Club, Raider Club, and Color Guard.

ROTC 3232. Advanced Leadership and Military Tactics 2 (3-2-4) Prerequisite: ROTC 3231. Continues methodology of instruction for ROTC-3231. Cadets continue to be challenged with various leadership roles requiring them to analyze tasks, and supervise. Classroom subjects continue to develop and reinforce the Army’s 12 Leadership dimensions, leadership styles, motivation and counseling techniques, and small unit patrolling and defensive operations. Academic classes meet three hours per week. Leadership laboratory meets every other week for four hours. Advanced course students are required to attend physical training and one weekend field training exercises (FTX). Optional activities include participation in Ranger Challenge, Cadet Club, Raider Club, and Color Guard.

ROTC 3415. ROTC Advanced Camp (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair. A five-week camp conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington. Only open to (and required of) students who have completed all ROTC-3000 level courses and ROTC 5419. The student receives pay. Travel, lodging and most meal costs are defrayed by the U.S. Army. The advanced Camp environment is highly structured and demanding, stressing leadership at small unit levels under varying, challenging conditions. Individual leadership and basic skills performance are evaluated throughout the camp. Although this course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only, the leadership and skills evaluations at the camp weigh heavily in the subsequent selection process that determines the type commission and job opportunities given to the student upon graduation from ROTC and the university. (S/U grading.)

ROTC 3416. ROTC Nurse Summer Training Program (3-0-3) Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair. Consists of five weeks at an advanced Camp (see ROTC 3430) and up to three weeks serving as a nurse in a military medical treatment facility. Only open to (and required of) nursing students who have completed ROTC 3231, 3232, and 5419. The student receives pay. Travel, lodging and most meal costs are defrayed by the U.S. Army. The student receives pay. Travel, lodging and most meal costs are defrayed by the U.S. Army. The camp and clinical environments are demanding, stressing leadership and nursing under varying, challenging conditions. The leadership and skills evaluations weigh heavily in the subsequent selection process that determines the job opportunities offered to the nurse upon graduation.

ROTC 4245. Leadership Challenge and Goal Setting (3-2-4) Prerequisite: ROTC 3232. Advanced leadership develop and instruction in how to plan, organize, conduct, and evaluate Army training utilizing the activities of the ROTC cadet organization. Articulate goals, put plans into action to attain them. Assess organizational cohesion and develop strategies to improve it. Develop confidence in skills to lead people and manage resources. Learn/apply various Army policies and programs in this effort. Classroom instruction continues strong focus on the Army’s 12 Leadership dimensions with particular emphasis on developing each cadet’s particular leadership style. Subjects include the study of the Army’s training philosophy, military correspondence, military justice system, and staff functions. Academic classes meet three hours per seek. Leadership laboratory meets every other week for four hours. Advanced course students are required to attend physical training and one weekend field training exercises (FTX). Optional activities include participation in Ranger Challenge, Cadet Club, Raider Club, and Color Guard.

ROTC 4419. Physical Fitness Techniques (0-3-1) Open to all students/cadets but required of all contracted cadets. Designed to challenge students at all levels of fitness from basic to advanced. This is a hands-on course. Students participate in and learn to plan, organize, and lead physical fitness training/programs. Develops the physical fitness required of an officer in today’s Army. Emphasis is on the development of an individual fitness program and the no military obligation for taking the course.

ROTC 4795. Transition to Lieutenant (3-2-4) Prerequisite: ROTC 4245. Capstone course for all military science courses. The course is conducted as a seminar and prepares senior cadets for their transition from cadet to commissioned officer. Classroom subjects cover leadership ethics and case studies (requires students to be able to identify and resolve dilemmas); career management; and general military subjects from Army Family Team Building (ATFB) to Suicide Prevention that an officer needs to be familiar with to be an effective leader. The seminar will involve guest speakers, some lecture, individual and team oral presentations, and group discussion on the various topics. Academic classes meet three hours per week. Leadership laboratory meets every other week for four hours. Advanced course students are required to attend physical training and one weekend field training exercises (FTX). Optional activities include participation in Ranger Challenge, Cadet Club, Raider Club, and Color Guard.


Return to Top of Page

Last Updated: 2/1/11