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ANTH 1105. Cultural Anthropology (3-0-3) A comparative, descriptive, non-technical study of non-literate folk societies. Topics include: basic institutions; value systems; the nature of culture, its content, patterns and changes; the impact of the cultural milieu on socialization and personality development.


ANTH 1107. Discovering Archaeology (3-0-3) Emphasizes scientific techniques and methodologies employed by archaeologists to reconstruct extinct cultures and lifeways, stages of archaeological investigation from hypothesis development to data interpretation, and heritage conservation. Provides opportunity for students to critically contrast the scientific nature of archeology with pop and pseudo-archaeology popularized by media.


ANTH 2105. Ancient World Civilizations (3-0-3) Course traces rise of world's first major civilizations from emergence of Homo sapiens to the advent of written history. The emergence of food production, social inequality, cities and conquest states in each world area will be examined, as will the major anthropological theories devised to explain them. Emphasized is diversity of world civilizations, the variety of paths to civilization taken around the globe, and especially "non-western" civilizations of sub-Saharan Africa, the Far East and the Americas.


ANTH 2136. Language and Culture (3-0-3) A study of the relationship between language and culture in multilingual and multicultural societies throughout the world. Topics include: language practices (i.e. name giving in Africa, oral tradition of the Caribbean, use of proverbs), language attitudes towards dialects, multilingualism and identity, the immigrant experience, effects of language contact (i.e., language mixing and borrowing), and language planning and choice in multilingual societies.


ENGL 2136. Language and Culture (3-0-3) A study of the relationship between language and culture in multilingual and multicultural societies throughout the world. Topics include: language practices (i.e. name giving in Africa, oral tradition of the Caribbean, use of proverbs), language attitudes towards dialects, multilingualism and identity, the immigrant experience, effects of language contact (i.e., language mixing and borrowing), and language planning and choice in multilingual societies.


GEOG 1101. World Regional Geography (3-0-3) This course provides a framework for recognizing and analyzing the major distinctive regions of the world in comparative context emphasizing various inter-relations among environment, culture, economy, politics, and history.


HIST 1111. World History to 1500 (3-0-3) A survey of world history to early modern times.


HIST 1112. World History since 1500 (3-0-3) A survey of world history from early modern times to the present.


INTS 2105. Introduction to International Studies and Cross-Cultural Learning (3-0-3) Introduction to International Studies is an interdisciplinary course which creates a conceptual framework, knowledge base and skill set for students in various disciplines seeking to understand other cultures and countries, and globalization. Students will learn about the role of culture in communication and interpersonal relationships and the process of and challenges to moving between cultures. In addition the course will explore the origins and complex nature of globalization in today's world as it integrates and repels cultures and countries across the world. This course must be completed before the student has completed 12 credit hours in the International Studies Certificate.


ITDS 1156. Understanding Non-Western Cultures (3-0-3) An examination of non-western systems of thought to increase understanding of cultural diversity and the process of cultural traditions. (Course fee required.)